Certified Pre-Owned

Arriving in style isn’t just an option. It’s a necessity. And substance? We’ve got plenty. Every Chrysler, Jeep®, Dodge, and RAM Certified Pre-Owned Vehicle (CPOV) has to pass our stringent certification process guaranteeing that only the finest vehicles get certified.

Warranty Information

Driving one of our Certified Pre-Owned Vehicles means you’re well taken care of, on the road and off.

  • 3-Month/3,000-Mile Maximum Care Warranty(1)
  • Up to 7-Year/100,000 Mile Powertrain Limited Warranty (2, 3)
  • Lifetime Certified Upgrade Plans(4)

125-Point Inspection

To know the exact condition of your vehicle, we put ’em to the test with a rigorous 125-point inspection.

  • Qualification Standards
  • Ownership Materials
  • Mechanical Standards
  • Maintenance Standards
  • Appearance Standards
  • Detail Standards

 

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How Safe Is The Jeep Compass?

Jeep Compass Earns IIHS Top Safety Pick

The Jeep Compass has been a staple in the crossover SUV field for ten years, zipping around town and still having the capability to tackle the drive to a remote trailhead. You can do all that with confidence, now that the Compass has joined the ranks of vehicles qualifying for the Institute for Highway Safety’s Top Safety Pick.

Jeep redesigned the Compass for the first time since 2007, building in enough upgrades to qualify it for the IIHS Top Safety Pick—that is if you pick one up with the crash prevention package

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What to Do If Your Car Breaks Down

Image result for car broken down

Follow some of these steps if your vehicle breaks down, and take extra precaution if you are in a busy intersection or on a highway.

Getting out of the car at a busy intersection or on a highway to change a tire or check damage from a fender bender is probably one of the worst things you can do. The Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.) recommends the following precautions when your car breaks down:

  1. Never get out of the vehicle to make a repair or examine the damage on a busy highway. Get the vehicle to a safe place before getting out. If you have been involved in an accident, motion the other driver to pull up to a safe spot ahead.
  2. If you cannot drive the vehicle, it may be safer to stay in the vehicle and wait for help or use a cell phone to summon help. Standing outside the vehicle in the flow of traffic, under most circumstances, is a bad idea.
  3. Carry flares or triangles to use to mark your location once you get to the side of the road. Marking your vehicle’s location to give other drivers advance warning of your location can be critical. Remember to put on your hazard lights!
  4. In the case of a blowout or a flat tire, move the vehicle to a safer place before attempting a repair – even if it means destroying the wheel getting there. The cost of a tire, rim or wheel is minor compared to endangering your safety.

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Tips to Check Tire Tread

Person changing tire after a tire blowout

Tire problems are thought to be a factor in one out of 11 vehicle crashes.1 Blowouts, tread separation, under inflation, and worn treads—the grooves in your tires that offer stability and traction—are some of the tire problems associated with these crashes.

Like a pair of sneakers that get more slippery with use, your tires lose their ability to grip the road as their treads wear down. Checking your tire treads can help keep you safer on the road. It only takes a few minutes, and some spare change.

Putting the Brakes on an Age-Old Debate About When to Replace Tires

Many people think only worn tires need to be replaced. That is certainly true. But old tires are also a concern. As tires age, they become more prone to failure, whether they have been used or not.

Replacing tires when they are between 6 and 10 years old is recommended by some manufacturers.2 That goes for the spare in your trunk, too. You can use the last four digits of the Tire Identification Number (TIN) on the wall of your tire to help determine the age of your tire (e.g., 2613 means the tire was manufactured in the 26th week of 2013).3

But age is not the only factor. Tread matters too. A worn tire can be just as dangerous, or even more so, than one that is simply old. In one study, vehicles with shallower treads (less than 2/32″ deep) were 3 times more likely to experience pre-crash tire troubles than those with deeper treads.4

 

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Share the Road

Person driving behind a car and sharing the road with another car

We have all encountered scenarios in which other drivers make us shake our heads. People often are quick to accuse other drivers of being reckless, but if pressed, they may admit to sometimes driving recklessly themselves. If unsafe driving is everyone’s problem, what is the solution?

Our safety professionals have put together three tips that can help make sharing the road safer while getting from point A to B.

Assume You are Invisible

It can be easy to assume everyone else on the road is paying attention, following traffic laws, and can see you clearly. However, that is not always the case. Next time you are expecting another driver to respect your right-of-way or let you merge into another lane, do not assume they are on the same page.

Avoid Competitive Driving

Whenever you are on the road, resist the urge to drive competitively. Instead, go with the flow and drive defensively. See yourself as part of a community of drivers – all trying to get to your destinations safely. Your improved driving behavior may rub off on others and help create safer conditions for everyone on the road.

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